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Cargill and Huntsman commit to choosing most fuel-efficient ships

January 14, 2013

Agribusiness giant Cargill has joined with chemicals player Huntsman and petroleum trader Unipec UK (London) to make a commitment to chartering only the most efficient vessels operating in the international shipping market, and thereby to reduce related carbon emissions.

Agribusiness giant Cargill has joined with chemicals player Huntsman and petroleum trader Unipec UK (London) to make a commitment to chartering only the most efficient vessels operating in the international shipping market, and thereby to reduce related carbon emissions.

The agreement is said to be the first of its kind, and commits the companies to choosing ships based on their greenhouse gas emissions, using fuel efficiency ratings of the Existing Vessel Design Index (EVDI), a benchmarking system developed by RightShip (Melbourne) and Carbon War Room (Washington), which contains efficiency information on more than 60,000 vessels.
Ratings range from A (most efficient) to G (least efficient), comparing ships of similar size and type, including container ships, tankers, bulk carriers and general cargo vessels.
Together, Cargill, Huntsman and Unipec charter shipping for over 350M tonnes of commodities each year, and EVDI estimates the amount of CO2 per tonne of cargo per nautical mile travelled, for each nominated ship.

Jonathan Stoneley, environment and compliance manager for Cargill Ocean Transportation, said: “Cargill is committed to minimising our environmental impact throughout our global operations.”
t In July 2011, the International Maritime Organization introduced its Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI), which will apply a similar index to new vessels.
The European Commission has said it will introduce a shipping emissions monitoring system early in 2013, to apply to all ships calling at EU ports. The Commission sees this as the starting point for further action on GHG emissions from ships, ultimately involving market-based measures such as emission trading or fuel levies (see previous OFIs).


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